The End of Gravity Falls

To answer the article picture’s question, yes, yes he would.  It was announced tonight by show creator Alex Hirsch that Gravity Falls would not have a third season.  Knowing that many fans might raise their virtual pitchforks under the belief that the series had been cancelled by Disney Studios, he explained that much like the show, everything is going according to plan.  The show is coming to an end due to the fact that the story is finished, that the series was never meant to go beyond the story of two kids and one wicked and twisted summer.  You can read all about it via Mr.Hirsch’s Tumblr.

A few quotes from the blog.

The first thing to know is that the show isn’t being cancelled- it’s being finished. This is 100% my choice, and its something I decided on a very long time ago. I always designed Gravity Falls to be a finite series about one epic summer- a series with a beginning, middle, and end. There are so many shows that go on endlessly until they lose their original spark, or mysteries that are cancelled before they ever get a chance to payoff.

But Gravity Falls was never meant to be a series that goes on and on forever. It’s meant to be an exploration of the experience of summer, and in a larger sense a story about childhood itself. The fact that childhood ends is exactly what makes it so precious- and why you should cherish it while it lasts.

  • Alex Hirsch

Gravity Falls creator Alex Hirsch announced on Friday that the show will end after the three-part “Weirdmageddon” arc. Part Two is set to air on Monday night on Disney XD and according to Nick and More, the third and final part will air in early 2016. Hirsch said on his Tumblr that the decision to end the show was his own and that he and the writers wanted to announce it before the start of Season Two, but were ‘restricted’ from doing so mainly because people hoped he would change his mind.

Hirsch continued that Gravity Falls “was never meant to be a series that goes on and on forever.” It was meant to be an exploration of the experience  of summer and about childhood itself. The fact that childhood ends is exactly what makes it so precious according to Hirsch.

Hirsch then said that he was grateful to the millions of fans who cherished the show and the fandom of Gravity Falls. There is also no plans to create a third season of the show without Hirsch. However, Hirsch then concluded that while has finished the story he wanted to tell about Dipper, Mable, and Grunkle Stan; doesn’t necessarily mean that we will never see them again.

It’s hard to believe that it will be all over after just 41 episodes and two seasons. As I said with Littlest Pet Shop ending after the current season, it’s always sad when a cartoon show goes away. Indeed, some will say it is going too soon. It averaged over 3.3 million viewers per episode for Season One before being punted to Disney XD where the show has averaged more than one million viewers an episode which is far and away ahead of other Disney XD shows like Wander Over Yonder (386,000 average per first-run episode on the channel) and Star vs. the Forces of Evil (617,500 per first-run episode).

The first season of 20 episodes ran over 14 months from June 2012 to August 2013. After a 12-month wait (longer that MLP’s between Seasons 4 and 5), Season Two started and will have gone at least 17 months. The show did not air new episodes on back-to-back weeks since August 4th and 11th of 2014. That in a way, made almost every episode an event like the revelation that the author of the journals was Stan’s long lost brother. How Bill Cipher figures into everything. What other mysteries are inGravity Falls?  

Of course, I’d be remiss to mention the MLP-link in Supervising Producer and Director Rob Renzetti who was story editor onFriendship is Magic for its first two seasons.

But as we all begrudgingly know, all good things must come to an end sometime. In the case of Gravity Falls, it will come early in 2016.

StatManDan

  • HalflingPony

    I’ve never had any interest in seeing Gravity Falls, but this kind of makes me want to watch it. I enjoy on-going, open-ended series like MLP, but pre-planned stories with finite lengths are almost always the stronger for it.

    Avatar: TLA, Babylon 5, as well as many excellent Anime series have all been done following the same approach of telling a finite story (often while leaving the possibility open for sequels) and it worked out well for them.

  • Andre Zlatin

    Well, a show like Over The Garden Wall, and Gravity Falls, finished and polished to the end, is short but sweet. Hope for more shows like these in the future. Farewell, Dipper and Mabel (and Waddles), goodbye Stan and Soos (and Ford), ol’ Man McGucket, Wendy and the rest, I’ll miss you Bill, Blendin Blendin, Schmebulok, the NorthWest family, and Time Baby. *sobs*…
    That was good. I am feeling so much better now.

  • Anonymous

    Hirsch’s FAQ is cute and refreshing for a creator of a show. I wasn’t expecting Disney to be as supportive of his decision as he says. I bet Rob Renzetti, a veteran of many cartoons, had a good deal of wisdom and advice to offer. Best of luck with those exciting opportunities, Alex, and thank you.

    • Jaume

      I fear Disney knows that choice won’t hinge on Disney agreeing, and that thery can do like on episode 7, and just try to churn as many seasons they feel like it.