Category: My Little Pony

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Gather around as we expand on the Legends of Magic comic series, Tales 2-4. It’s the annual Big Sister/Little Sister campout to Winsome Falls. However, their campsite is disrupted by a swarm of fly-ders and the sisters have to retreat inside a cave. There, they start to tell campfire stories to pass the time until the fly-ders move on.

Applejack is first by telling the story of Rockhoof (from Legends of Magic #2) and his origins and how he joined the Mighty Helm. Rockhoof gained his mighty strength by digging a trench to redirect the flow of lava from an erupted volcano to save his village. Apple Bloom was really excited by this tale.

Next up is Rarity and she tells the story of Mistmane (Legends of Magic #3) and how she sacrificed her own beauty to save her kingdom. Finally, after Rainbow Dash prevents the fly-ders from coming into the cave by blocking the entrance, she tells the story of Flash Magnus (Legends of Magic #4) and how he braved past a couple of dragons to rescue a pair of comrades.

After making the best of the situation, the CMC and their respective big sisters take the back route and discover a shortcut to Winsome Falls. That’s a bit contrived, but the rest of this episode was quite fascinating.

Every since Issue #51 of the main series, the direction has been to link much closer to the main series in Season Seven. That apparently holds true with the Legends of Magic series and the ever present world building even at this stage of the series. If you have seen the three issues in question, you at least have an idea of all three. If not, I’ll post after the grade (WARNING: SPOILERS!). But seriously, do read the comics. Some of them could well have been episodes on the show—especially some of the early issues.

The best of the three was the story of Mistmane with the scenery which seems to inspired from Ancient Japan as well as the Double Dragon battle between Mistmane and Sable Spirit.

Overall, this was a pleasant episode, as these flashbacks to a different usually are, and a nice tie-in to the comics which was promised just prior to the start of Season Seven.

GRADE: A-

StatManDan

WARNING: COMIC SPOILERS BELOW! If you do not wish to be spoiled by the synopses of these comics, look away now.

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My Little Pony 716 – Campfire Tales Episode Guide

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716 – “Campfire Tales”

Written by: Barry Safchik, Michael Platt
When their sister camping trip is ruined by Fly-ders, Applejack, Rarity and Rainbow Dash tell Sweetie Belle, Apple Bloom, and Scootaloo the stories of their favorite legends; inspired by the tales, the girls make the most out of their new situation.

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IDW Solicitations for November 2017

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Solicitations for books coming in November (as well as a couple for December) by IDW are after the break.

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MLP Equestria Girls – Summertime Shorts: Canterlot Movie Club Guide

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Equestria Girls – “Summertime Shorts: Canterlot Movie Club”

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This reminded me of a “Brady Bunch” episode once. Anyway, Spike has invited Dragon Lord Ember to Ponyville—as well as Changeling pack leader Thorax. The former is seeking friendship advice from Spike since the dragons’ competitive nature is a bit of hindrance. The latter wants to talk to Spike because he’s having a hard time with a pack of changelings who still prefer to feed off love. Spike is deathly afraid that neither will get along with each other and cause a war. This becomes Spike’s friendship problem to solve.

So, Spike (with the help of Twilight and Starlight) go out of their way to make sure Ember and Thorax do not see each other. After several awkward moments, the Thorax and Ember meet each other and nearly come to blows before Spike admits that trying to keep them apart fearing they would not get along. Ember thinking that because she’s “bad at friendship” and Thorax thinking that he may be too soft.

Actually, Thorax and Ember do get along on their own. Ember gives Thorax a lesson on being more assertive when enforcing rules of his pack and Thorax giving Ember lessons about talking about her feelings (what she didn’t like to do in “Gauntlet of Fire”). And then Spike learns a lesson about trusting his friends would get along with each other and his scales glow which means his friendship problem is solved.

About those awkward moments, some of them were funny. For example, Ember getting used to Pony customs and also mistaking Starlight and Twilight with each other. Of course, Twilight’s scene with the chairs was funny as well. However, this whole episode was weird with one awkward moment after another. It’s when Thorax and Ember have time alone that they start to click. It’s about giving them space to learn friendship and that was something Spike (and indirectly Twilight and Starlight) was not giving them. They are actually good in this episode, it’s Spike that was a bit iffy until late.

Nevertheless, it’s not a terrible episode, it’s good because of and despite some awkward moments from all the characters involved.

GRADE: B

StatManDan

My Little Pony 715 – Triple Threat Episode Guide

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715 – “Triple Threat”

Written by: Josh Hamilton
Spike accidentally invites Ember and Thorax to Ponyville on the same day. He’s sure the two new leaders are not going to get along so he does all he can to keep them apart and cover the fact that the other is there.

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So yes, “Fame and Misfortune” is a controversial episode for a number of reasons. Not the least of which is how the episode might have been targeting certain fans who are overly nitpicking, super judgmental, and basically being a “Quibble Pants” (pun and reference to “Stranger Than Fan Fiction” intended).

Let’s set something straight right off the bat. This is not targeting the fandom as a whole. Most fans do appreciate the show for what it is and there are fans that appreciate the show for displaying the Mane Six’s flaws and how the develop over time. No pony is perfect and the song did a great job in expressing that. But yes, some in the fandom do treat and over-analyze the show like it were the NFL or [insert Oscar-winning film here]. It is not either of those things.

There is also the lesson for the show staff in the episode. While they may not be able to change certain people’s attitudes towards episodes (and towards themselves occasionally), they can change the way they deal with such criticism. Granted, that didn’t occur in the episode until late, but it is still a good lesson.

Twilight had the best of intention about publishing the journal, but the best laid plans of mice and ponies go often askew. That leads to another frustration about the episode and the show as a whole—that fans ignore the lessons from the episode in favor of being overly critical and/or, worse, confronting show staff on social media about it. That is something I have addressed before and something I’ll likely have to address again.

Should we take the lessons from the show a bit more to heart? Actually, look around the world for a minute and answer that question yourself. Also, ask yourself this, “Why have so many people, both then and now, been drawn to the show to begin with?” I’ve also said previously that sometimes we need a reminder of why we watch this show to begin with.

I was at BronyCon last weekend I cannot help but feel that despite there not being as many people as there were the last two years, there was still a feeling of great positivity even if it was mostly negative outside the Baltimore Convention Center. Ask yourself this question: Why should “Friendship is Magic” be criticized for trying to teach morals while shows like “The Simpsons” and “Family Guy” are lionized for their cynicism and boorish “humor”.

Yes, there are always consequences when you put your story/thoughts out that that someone will disagree with you and not be the most mature about it. Indeed, there are ways for me to deal with that and some are most professional than others, but just remember that the episode in question was not tarring the fandom as a whole with the same brush. Most fans are appreciative of the show and have been inspired from the show and fan content it has spun off. (One frequent comment at BronyCon last weekend was how there was so much talent around.) There are prices to being famous, but some people can be taxing excessively through being super judgmental.

StatManDan